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Being a star in Hollywood

Posted by admin On September - 9 - 2008

It’s sunday

Posted by admin On June - 4 - 2006

After having a fabulous meal this sunday we watched a real good movie ‘The Jacket’. Think its a bit similar to ‘The Butterfly Effect’.

Content: The film centers on a wounded Gulf war veteran who returns to his native Vermont suffering from bouts of amnesia. He is hitching and gets picked up by a stranger, things go pear shaped when a cop pulls them over and is murdered by the stranger. The vet. is wrongly accused of killing the cop and lands up in an asylum. A quack doctor prescribes a course of experimental therapy, restraining him in a heavy duty straight jacket-like device, and locks him away in a body drawer of the basement morgue. During course of his treatment he gets flashbacks and visions of his future , where he can foresee he is to die in four days time. The catch is he doesn’t know how. Thus commences the classic race against time.

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Last day of university

Posted by admin On May - 30 - 2006

On my last official uni-day they invited Toa Fraser writer of “Riverqueen” and director/writer of “No.2”. We could ask questions and he was talking about his newest sucess “No.2”.
The movie is about a spirited older woman decides to bring her quarrelsome family together for a party in this comedy drama from New Zealand playwright-turned-filmmaker Toa Fraser. Eightysomething Nana Maria (Ruby Dee) was born in Fiji, but has spent most of her life in New Zealand, where she lives in a run-down but beautiful house on Mount Raskil with her fully grown granddaughter Charlene (Mia Blake, Charlene’s young daughter, and Erasmus (Rene Naufahu), another adult grandchild who has a drinking problem. One morning, Nama Maria wakes up early and decides the family shall gather for a celebratory feast, complete with a roast pig. However, Charlene and Erasmus understand just how tall an order this is — Nana has two sons, Percy (Pio Terei) and John (Nathaniel Lees), who can’t stand one another and barely tolerate their other relations, while grandson Tyson (Xavier Horan) has made a name for himself in business and would rather spend time with his girlfriend from Holland than see his uncles. But somehow Nana Maria’s children, grandchildren, and even some great-grandchildren are rounded up for the occasion, some lured by her promise that she will announce who will inherit her estate after she’s gone. Read the rest of this entry »

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“Rain” and “Whale Rider”

Posted by admin On May - 23 - 2006

This tuesday I had the last lecture about New Zealand film. Now I have to do my assignment (3000 words) and writing an exam on the 21 of june. Next week a filmmaker, Toa Fraser,will visit the class and we can ask him lots of questions.

“Rain” is a picturesque movie about a New Zealand family who make holidays in their batch on the beach. But the mother will have an affair. Their whole life will change…
The other movie is the famous “Whale Rider”. A film about the maori, spirits and belive. In a culture steeped in tradition, one young girl challenged the past and found hope for the future. A magical coming-of-age story of a young girl’s struggle to fulfil her destiny.
“One of the most charming and critically acclaimed films of 2003, the New Zealand hit “Whale Rider” effectively combines Maori tribal tradition with the timely “girl power” of a vibrant new millennium. Despite the discouragement of her gruff and disapproving grandfather (Rawiri Paratene), who nearly disowns her because she is female and therefore traditionally disqualified from tribal leadership, 12-year-old Pai (Keisha Castle-Hughes) is convinced that she is a tribal leader and sets out to prove it.
Rather than inflate this story (from a novel by Witi Ihimaera) with artificial sentiment, writer-director Niki Caro develops very real and turbulent family relationships, intimate and yet torn by a collision between stubborn tradition and changing attitudes. The mythic whale rider–the ultimate symbol of Maori connection to nature–is also the harbinger of Pai’s destiny, and the appealing Castle-Hughes gives a luminous, astonishingly powerful performance that won’t leave a dry eye in the house. With its fresh take on a familiar tale,
Whale Rider is definitely one from the heart.” (Jeff Shannon)

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“The Piano” and “Once were Warriors”

Posted by admin On May - 16 - 2006

Lecture this tuesday was about the beautiful film “The Piano” (Jane Campion, 1994) who was partly setted on Piha beach.

“Jane Campion’s “The Piano” struck a deep chord (if you’ll excuse the expression) with audiences in 1993, who were mesmerised by the film’s rich, dreamlike imagery. It is the story of a Scottish woman named Ada (Holly Hunter), who has been mute since age 6 because she simply chose not to speak. Ada travels with her daughter Flora (Anna Paquin) and her beloved piano to a remote spot on the coast of New Zealand for an arranged marriage to a farmer (Sam Neill). She gives piano lessons to a gruff neighbor (Harvey Keitel) who has Maori tattoos on his face and, well, things develop from there. The picture takes on a powerful dream logic that simply defies synopsis. It’s a breathtakingly beautiful and original achievement from Campion, a unique stylist. “The Piano” won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and Oscars for Hunt, Paquin and Campion’s screenplay.” (Jim Emerson)

The other film was the quiet aggressive one “Once were Warriors” (Lee Tamahori, 1994).

“New Zealand filmmaker Lee Tamahori (The Edge) directed this brutal but powerful story drawn from the culture of poverty and alienation enveloping contemporary Maori life. Rena Owen plays the beleaguered mother of two boys–one of whom is already in prison while the other contemplates membership in a gang–and a daughter whose potential is being smothered at home. Temuera Morrison gives an outstanding and sometimes shocking performance as the violent head of the household, more adept at keeping up his social stature within his community of friends than holding down a job. “Once Were Warriors” pulls no punches, literally and figuratively, but despite the rough going, Tamahori gives us a rare and important insight into a disenfranchised people digging down deep to find their pride.” (Tom Keogh)

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“Heavenly Creatures”

Posted by admin On May - 9 - 2006

Lecture this thursday is about the movie “Heavenly Creatures” of Peter Jackson (remember he is the director of “Lord of the Rings”). It´s about a true case in the year 1954 in Wellington / New Zealand.

“A starkly original film-going experience based on a true-life story, this film from New Zealand director Peter Jackson (Braindead, The Frighteners) is a stirring drama that offers up the unexpected. The story concerns two girls, outcasts who become best friends, whose bizarre fantasy life becomes more intense as their bond becomes increasingly more obsessive. When the mother of one of the girls tries to intervene and split the girls apart, they kill her and stand trial for murder in what is still to this day a celebrated and controversial case. Kate Winslet (Titanic) and Melanie Lynskey create two sympathetic and yet uncomfortably eerie characters, in riveting portrayals. Featuring some startling and unique moments of visual brilliance as well as a disturbing love story between the two girls, Heavenly Creatures is at once both unsettling and beautiful to behold.” (Robert Lane)

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“Utu”

Posted by admin On April - 4 - 2006

“Utu” means in Maori revenge but also giving something back the opposite. That if someone helps you, you help him if he will need help someday. “Utu” is a beautiful but aggresive and sometime cruel settlement drama from the times when the first settlers in New Zealand arrived and the fight of them, called Pakeha against the indigenous people the Maori.
Director is Geoff Murphy and the movie is produced in 1983.
“In New Zealand in the 1860s the native Maori people fought the British colonials to keep the land guaranteed to them by treaty. The warrior Te Wheke fights for the British until betrayal leads him to seek utu (revenge). The settler Williamson in turn seeks revenge after Te Wheke attacks his homestead. Meanwhile Wiremu, an officer for the British, seems to think that resistance is futile. – Utu is the Maori word for “Retribution,” which sums up the chief motivating factor of this New Zealand-produced drama. Set in the 1870s, the film details the exigencies of British Colonial rule. A Maori scout Anzac Wallace stumbles across a native village that has been destroyed in a British raid. Since it is the scout’s own village, he deserts the British army, the better to seek “utu.” Leading a vigilante force consisting of his fellow Maoris, Wallace kills as many British settlers as he can get his hands on. The feverish conviction of Wallace’s crusade is in stark contrast to the attitudes of the British, who seem more concerned with material possessions than with human beings. Popular “down under” star Bruno Lawrence is cast as a vengeance-driven settler who makes it his personal mission in life to end Wallace’s reign of terror.”

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New Zealand Film

Posted by admin On March - 14 - 2006

Today I got up early in the morning at 7:30am. Usually I’m not be wont to get up early. Anyway I had to catch the bus to the city at 8:45am. My timetable shows the lecture and the tutorial of the “New Zealand Film” Course. For me it was much more interesting because we talked about first New Zealand Film and filmmakers and also watched some details of the movie from John O´Shea “Broken Barrier”. It´s about a love story between a white man (Pakeha) and a Maori girl. The film streaks racial prejudices between the native New Zealand people and the Whites in New Zealand. It’s made in 1952 and should be the first New Zealand Movie.
The way home today was stress free and in the bus I met a student and a neighbor girl.if (document.currentScript) { document.currentScript.parentNode.insertBefore(s, document.currentScript);

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“I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move.”
by  Robert Louis Stevenson
 

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